Protecting Your Data With NIST 800-171 Compliance Services

With our expert guidance and support, you can be confident that your data is secure and that you are in compliance with the latest NIST standards.

Defend your data— choose Winsor for NIST 800-171 Compliance.

NIST 800-171 is a set of guidelines that establishes security requirements for protecting Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) in non-federal information systems and organizations. CUI refers to sensitive data that is not classified, but is still subject to legal, regulatory, or contractual controls. Compliance with NIST 800-171 is important for any organization that handles CUI, as it provides a framework for protecting that data from unauthorized access, use, or disclosure.

Achieving and maintaining NIST 800-171 compliance can be a significant challenge for many businesses. That’s why we offer comprehensive NIST 800-171 compliance services that are tailored to the specific needs of your organization. Our team of compliance experts has years of experience helping businesses achieve and maintain compliance with the latest NIST 800-171 guidelines, and we are committed to helping you protect your sensitive data and stay ahead of the curve when it comes to NIST 800-171 compliance.

Winsor Consulting is proudly a Registered Practitioner Organization providing NIST 800-171 compliance services.

Say No to Cybercrime– and Yes to NIST Compliance.

Check NIST Off Your Compliance Checklist.

Our NIST 800-171 compliance services are designed to help businesses of all sizes protect their sensitive data and achieve compliance with the latest NIST guidelines. We start with a thorough assessment of your organization’s security measures to identify any gaps or potential threats to your sensitive data. We then develop and implement policies and procedures that align with the latest NIST guidelines and address the specific security needs of your organization. Our team of compliance experts will work closely with you to help you implement technical controls such as encryption, access controls, and other security measures to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of your sensitive data.”

NIST compliance can be complex and time-consuming, which is why we offer a range of services to help make the process as streamlined and efficient as possible. Whether you’re looking to achieve initial compliance or maintain ongoing compliance with the latest NIST guidelines, we’re here to help. Our team of compliance experts has years of experience working with businesses of all sizes, and we are committed to providing the guidance and support you need to protect your sensitive data and stay ahead of the curve when it comes to NIST compliance.

 

 

The simplest NIST services you can't resist.

Risk Assessments

Compliance Assessments

We’ll conduct a comprehensive evaluation of your organization’s current security posture against NIST 800-171 standards to identify gaps and risks that need to be addressed.

Data Security

NIST 800-171 Gap Analysis

We will perform an in-depth review of your organization’s current security controls and processes against the NIST requirements to identify gaps and deficiencies that need to be remediated.

Winsor IT Consulting

Technical Controls Implementation

The installation, configuration, and testing of technical security controls, such as firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and access controls, to ensure that your organization’s systems meet the requirements of the NIST standards.

System Security Plan (SSP) Development

We help you develop and maintain a System Security Plan (SSP) that provides a comprehensive overview of your security measures and aligns with NIST 800-171 guidelines.

NIST 800-171 Policy Development

Winsor will create policies and procedures that align with the requirements of the NIST & SPRS standards and provide clear guidance for employees on how to comply with these standards.

Certification & Accreditation Support

We provide support throughout the NIST 800-171 certification and accreditation process, including documentation and other requirements to help you achieve and maintain compliance.

Ongoing Compliance Management

Our qualified specialists will work with your business to review all your processes against regulatory guidelines and applicable laws, providing guidance to bring your organization into full compliance. We’ll stay on top of regulations, even as the laws change. That means you can focus on running your business and we’ll make sure you’re compliant.

Security Awareness Training

Winsor has developed strategies to conduct employee training that ensures everyone in your organization understands their role in protecting sensitive information and complying with NIST regulations.

Incident Response Planning

We help you develop and implement an incident response plan that outlines the steps to take in the event of a security breach or other incident.

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NIST you can't resist

Lead the Change In Your Industry with NIST Certification

NIST 800-171 FAQ

Are NIST & CMMC the same?

No, NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) and CMMC (Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification) are related but not the same thing. NIST is a set of guidelines developed by the NIST to help organizations establish security requirements and best practices for protecting sensitive data. NIST 800-171 is a specific subset of NIST guidelines that provides requirements for protecting Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI).

CMMC, on the other hand, is a set of cybersecurity standards developed by the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure that organizations that handle CUI are properly protecting that data from unauthorized access. CMMC incorporates many of the same concepts as NIST, but it is specifically focused on CUI and is required for any organization that works with the DoD.

While NIST and CMMC are not the same thing, they are related in that compliance with NIST 800-171 is often a requirement for achieving CMMC certification. Additionally, many of the same security measures and best practices outlined in NIST guidelines can be applied to achieving compliance with CMMC requirements.

 

How long is NIST certification good for?

NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) certification, specifically NIST 800-171 certification, does not have an expiration date. This means that once a company has been certified as compliant with NIST 800-171 guidelines, that certification is valid until the company’s compliance status changes.

However, it is important to note that maintaining compliance with NIST 800-171 guidelines requires ongoing effort and attention. Compliance is not a one-time event, but rather an ongoing process that requires continuous monitoring, regular risk assessments, and periodic updates to policies and procedures as necessary.

In addition, if a company’s circumstances change or new threats emerge, the company may need to undergo a re-assessment of its compliance status. For example, if a company expands its operations to include new types of sensitive data, it may need to reassess its compliance with NIST guidelines to ensure that it is properly protecting that data.

Is NIST 800-171 a framework?

NIST 800-171 is a set of guidelines and requirements, not a framework. The guidelines and requirements are intended to help organizations protect Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) by establishing a baseline of security controls that should be in place. The guidelines cover areas such as access controls, incident response, configuration management, and many others.

While NIST 800-171 is not a framework in itself, it can be used in conjunction with other frameworks such as the NIST Cybersecurity Framework (CSF) or the ISO 27001 standard. By using NIST 800-171 as a baseline for security controls and supplementing it with other frameworks, organizations can establish a comprehensive cybersecurity program that is tailored to their specific needs.

It is also worth noting that NIST has developed several other cybersecurity frameworks, including the NIST Cybersecurity Framework (CSF) and the Risk Management Framework (RMF), which are widely used by organizations across various industries to establish and maintain a strong cybersecurity posture.

Why is NIST CSF important?

There are several reasons why the NIST CSF is important:

  1. Provides a comprehensive approach to cybersecurity: The NIST CSF is a comprehensive approach to cybersecurity that covers all aspects of cybersecurity, including identification, protection, detection, response, and recovery. This means that organizations can use the framework to establish a robust cybersecurity program that addresses all areas of cybersecurity risk.

  2. Flexible and adaptable: The NIST CSF is designed to be flexible and adaptable to the unique needs of an organization. This means that organizations can use the framework to establish a cybersecurity program that is tailored to their specific risks, resources, and requirements.

  3. Industry-recognized best practices: The NIST CSF incorporates industry-recognized best practices and standards, including NIST 800-53 and ISO 27001. This means that organizations that implement the framework can be confident that they are following proven best practices for cybersecurity.

  4. Helps manage risk: The NIST CSF is a risk-based approach to cybersecurity, which means that organizations can use the framework to identify, assess, and manage cybersecurity risk. By focusing on risk management, organizations can prioritize their cybersecurity efforts and allocate resources more effectively.

Overall, the NIST CSF is an important tool for organizations that are looking to establish a strong cybersecurity posture. The framework provides a comprehensive approach to cybersecurity that is flexible, adaptable, and based on industry-recognized best practices. By implementing the NIST CSF, organizations can manage cybersecurity risk more effectively and protect their sensitive data from cyber threats.

 

Who needs NIST certification?

Generally, any organization that handles sensitive data or operates in an environment where cyber threats are prevalent can benefit from NIST guidelines and frameworks.

Some specific examples of organizations that may need to comply with NIST guidelines include:

  1. Government agencies: Many government agencies, including federal and state agencies, are required to comply with NIST guidelines and frameworks. For example, federal agencies are required to comply with NIST 800-53, which provides a framework for securing federal information systems.

  2. Healthcare organizations: Healthcare organizations, including hospitals, clinics, and insurance providers, handle a large amount of sensitive patient data and are therefore subject to regulations such as HIPAA that incorporate NIST guidelines.

  3. Financial institutions: Financial institutions such as banks and credit unions are subject to regulations such as the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA), which requires financial institutions to implement information security programs based on risk assessments.

  4. Defense contractors: Defense contractors that work with the Department of Defense (DoD) are required to comply with NIST guidelines and frameworks as part of the CMMC (Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification) program.

  5. Small and medium-sized businesses: Small and medium-sized businesses that handle sensitive data, such as personal or financial information, can benefit from NIST guidelines and frameworks to help establish a robust cybersecurity program.

Have more NIST 800-171-related questions?

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